Media Watch: Joe Cole backs Kai Havertz for central role, Loftus-Cheek delighted with Fulham opportunity, Mourinho and Wenger renew rivalry

In our look at the latest Chelsea-related news stories from the media, Joe Cole shares his thoughts on one of our major summer signings.

These stories are samples pulled from external media sources. They do not represent the views or position of Chelsea Football Club.

Cole tips Havertz for central role

Former Chelsea midfielder Joe Cole has told BT Sport that Kai Havertz is best suited for a central attacking role at Chelsea following his arrival from Bayer Leverkusen.

The 21-year-old made his Premier League debut for the Blues as a right winger in our 3-1 win at Brighton but has featured in the middle behind the striker in a 4-2-3-1 system more recently. Cole feels that is the best position for the German, as he can be as effective in linking up the play in a central role as Roberto Firmino in Jurgen Klopp’s Liverpool side.

‘I see him as a Firmino-type player where he knits it together. So you want him playing central, you want him in these positions,’ said Cole as reported by football.london. ‘He's got spatial awareness where he can bring players into the game.

‘When you have a player of his quality, anytime he receives the ball, in any one of those positions he can hurt you. When you play in this position you have to understand how to make space.

‘I think he will score lots of goals from this position. Players are going to love playing with him, like how [Liverpool] players love playing with Firmino.

‘He's such an exciting player and I feel his impact on this Chelsea team will not just be goals and assists, but bringing the best out of the likes of Pulisic, Mount, Callum [Hudson-Odoi] and Tammy [Abraham] because he can knit it together.’

Loftus-Cheek relishes opportunity for playing time

Ruben Loftus-Cheek has told Fulham’s official club website he is pleased to get the chance to play more minutes on loan with the Cottagers after he made his debut for the club in a 1-1 draw at Sheffield United on Sunday.

Sent on loan by Chelsea for the season, the 24-year-old was given 81 minutes by manager Scott Parker – himself a former Blues midfielder – as he made his longest competitive appearance in 17 months after suffering an Achilles injury which kept him out of action for over a year.

‘I think this is only my third or fourth start since my injury,’ said the England midfielder. ‘So it’s a good opportunity for me to play some football and find my form and I really enjoyed playing with Fulham today.’

While newly promoted Fulham remained in the bottom three after picking up what was their first point of the season, Loftus-Cheek believes our west London neighbours can claw their way out of trouble.

‘I’ve come into the place and there was such a good vibe and attitude that even though we haven’t won yet, the belief is still there and you can feel it on the pitch,’ he said.

‘We played some really good football and created chances, so the belief is there and the win we feel is coming.’

Mourinho and Wenger renew rivalry

The animosity between Jose Mourinho and Arsene Wenger during their time in the Chelsea and Arsenal dugouts was one of English football’s biggest managerial rivalries, and their war of words has returned following the publication of Wenger’s autobiography.

The absence of any mention of his rival Mourinho in the book raised eyebrows, and the Portuguese, now managing Tottenham, responded in typical style by saying: ‘[It's] because he never beat me. You are not going to do a chapter about 14 matches that you never win so why should he speak about me in a book.

‘A book is a thing to make you happy, make you proud. So I understand perfectly the situation.’

However, Wenger has hit back at those words from Mourinho, as reported by The Sun.

‘It doesn't bother me. It is permanent provocation,’ said Wenger. ‘I feel like I'm in kindergarten with him. But, that's part of his personality.

‘It's wrong, we beat him twice. We won, and there were also a lot of draws. And it is not “you” who wins, you only participate in the victory. It is “us” who win. The manager is there to get the most out of a team.’

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